Symposium 2015 | Abstract Expressionism: Time, Intention, Conservation, and Meaning – Clyfford Still Museum

Symposium 2015 | Abstract Expressionism: Time, Intention, Conservation, and Meaning

At the Getty Center, Los Angeles

  • Dr. David Anfam, Senior Consulting Curator, Clyfford Still Museum, Opening Remarks
  • Nicholas Dorman, Chief Conservator, Seattle Art Museum, Conservation of Jackson Pollock’s Sea Change at the Seattle Art Museum
  • Brad Epley, Chief Conservator, the Menil Collection, and Dr. Corina Rogge, Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, and the Menil Collection, Response and Interplay Between Artist and Materials in the Late Paintings of Barnett Newman
  • Mary H. Gridley, Cranmer Art Group, Joan Mitchell: Cropping the Early Paintings
  • Dr. Narayan Khandekar, Director of the Straus Center for Conservation and Technical Studies; Director of the Center for the Technical Study of Modern Art, and Head of the Analytical Laboratory, Harvard Art Museums, Rothko’s Harvard Murals: An Image for a Public Place
  • Susan Lake, Conservator Emeritus, Smithsonian, Willem de Kooning and Colleagues: Technical Investigation and the Challenge of Preserving Modern Art
  • Tom Learner, head of Getty Conservation Institute’s science department, moderator of Roundtable Discussion
  • Patricia Smithen, Smithen Contemporary Conservation, Red Shifts: Managing Change in Rothko’s Seagram Murals at the Tate
  • James Squires, Senior Conservator, Clyfford Still Museum, State of Still: Conservation Efforts at the Clyfford Still Museum
  • Carol Stringari, Deputy Director and Chief Conservator of the Guggenheim Foundation, On Death and Dying: How Conservation Decisions Influence the Life and Trajectory of Artwork
  • Dr. Zahira Véliz-Bomford, Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, and Dr. Corina Rogge, Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, and the Menil Collection, Paint Never Behaves the Same: Franz Kline Case Studies

Watch videos of the 2015 symposium sessions below, or on our Vimeo channel.

Close ×
Denver’s collection. Online and open to all.

Welcome to our new online collection of 2,000+ works of art.

Enjoy full-screen viewing, deep-zoom resolution, and a slow-looking tool with every object.

We’ve also launched our archival research database with 1,900+ items.

Learn more here.